Listening - Plain Hunt Doubles

This page contains a a series of audio files generated from Abel, each ringing two leads of Plain Hunt Doubles. There is a tenor behind, which should help in hearing where the start of each change is. In each case, you will be listening to the treble; being the highest note in each change will help in picking it out. Start by listening to some perfectly-struck ringing and make sure you can hear the treble in every row. It may help to count all the places in each row, emphasising the place of the treble, i.e. -1-23456 1-2-3456 12-3-456 123-4-56 1234-5-6 1234-5-6 123-4-56 12-3-456 1-2-3456 -1-23456 -1-23456.

-1- 2 3 4 5  6 
1 -2- 3 4 5 6
1 2 -3- 4 5 6
1 2 3 -4- 5 6
1 2 3 4 -5- 6
1 2 3 4 -5- 6
1 2 3 -4- 5 6
1 2 -3- 4 5 6
1 -2- 3 4 5 6
-1- 2 3 4 5 6
-1- 2 3 4 5 6
Here is the plain course:

Now the treble will make some errors, although the initial rounds should be error-free, to establish the rhythm. There are two versions of each mistake, one in which the treble is either 50 milliseconds quick or slow and one in which the error is 80ms. Listen to see if you can hear the mistake, then you'll know what to be on guard for when you're ringing it in the tower.

1. A common mistake when hunting the treble is to fail to hold up enough. Here every blow on the way out is too quick:

50ms   80ms

2. In this example, just the blow in 2nds place on the way out is too quick:

50ms   80ms

3. Some people find the bell control required to hold up the backstrokes is a challenge. In these examples, the blow in 3rds place on the way out is too quick:

50ms   80ms

4. The backstroke in 5ths place is also prone to be rung too quickly too:

50ms   80ms

5. In this example, both of the backstrokes on the way up to the back are too quick (i.e. both 3rds place and 5ths place):

50ms   80ms

6. Then coming back down to the front, the tendency is often to be too slow, not ringing the bell quickly enough. Here, you should be able to hear a gap before every blow on the way in:

50ms   80ms

7. Even if you do ring quickly enough to start with, a common mistake is to slow down before you get right down to the lead, so the (backstroke) blow in 2nds place is too slow:

50ms   80ms

8. In general backstrokes have to be placed very positively, to stop them being slow on the way down. Here the treble is slow in both 4ths and 2nds places:

50ms   80ms

9. And then the leading is crucial, especially if you're about to need to hold up again. Here both the handstroke and backstroke leads are too quick:

50ms   80ms

10. In this one, both the handstroke and backstroke leads are too slow:

50ms   80ms

11. Now here are a few more errors. In this one, both blows in 5ths place are too quick:

50ms   80ms

12. Here, the treble really doesn't get high enough at all, ringing all four blows in 4ths and 5ths too quickly:

50ms   80ms

13. And now the treble is ringing even worse, being too quick all the way out to the back and too slow coming back in:

50ms   80ms

14. Here the backstrokes need a lot more work, as they are both too quick on the way up to the back and too slow coming down to the front:

50ms   80ms

15. Now for a selection of slow ringing on the way out. It doesn't usually happen as often as the quick examples above, but listen to the difference. Firstly too slow in 2nds place on the way up:

50ms   80ms

16. Then too slow in 3rds place on the way up:

50ms   80ms

17. This time both backstrokes on the way up are too slow (i.e. in 3rds and 5ths):

50ms   80ms

18. And here the treble is too slow in its blows in 5ths place, so the tenor clips it a bit:

50ms   80ms

Now time to test yourself. Which mistakes can you hear in each of these samples? All of them have appeared above.

A - 50ms   A - 80ms
B - 50ms   B - 80ms
C - 50ms   C - 80ms
D - 50ms   D - 80ms
E - 50ms   E - 80ms
F - 50ms   F - 80ms

The answers are here.

Please let me know if there are any mistakes above; it would be easily done with so many samples. Also, please let me know if there are any other listening exercises I can set up.

For the Bistow Doubles listening exercises, see here.